Occupied France during WW II

(If you are researching the Maginot Line, visit the student-created Maginot Line research page)

Library Books


First, you may want to look in the Encyclopedia Britannica for some solid background information.

The Uni High Library has a small number of books that may be of help. There are more books on campus that cover occupied France, especially in the History Library. Browse our stacks in the Holocaust section (940.5) and in the history of France section (944).

Possible subject terms to use when searching the Online Catalog are shown below. You can just cut and paste these into the search box. Be sure to select SUBJECT search.

Sample Terms:
World War, 1939-1945--France
World War, 1939-1945--France--Paris
World War, 1939-1945--Underground movements--France
World War, 1939-1945--Collaborationists--France
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)--France--Influence
World War, 1939-1945--Jews--Rescue--France
Vichy (France)--Politics and government
Anti-Nazi movement
Anti-Nazi movement France
Paris (France)--History--1940-1944
France--History--German occupation, 1940-1945
World War, 1939-1945--France--Chronology
Maginot Line (France)
Gaulle, Charles de, 1890-1970

Web Sites

You may want to try some of the sites below:

Sweet Search
SweetSearch is a Google-powered custom search engine that only searches 35,000 Web sites that a staff of research experts deems credible.

ipl2 Reference Resource Page
ipl2 is the result of a merger of the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians' Internet Index (LII). It has an excellent list of headings for online resources. This site provides indexed links to credible sites that have been evaluated and annotated. The History section provides numerous links to history-themed informational sites on the Web, and can be found under the Arts & Humanities link.

Timelines of History
Timelines on the site include: “a universal history timeline by period with an outside search engine for ancient history...timelines for countries with relative links listed for each country at the top of every country page...timelines of the US states and each state has internal links to relative information...and timelines by subject, including an extensive film archive.” Most timeline entries have a reference citation listed as to the source from which the information was obtained and a reference legend/bibliography is provided for these sources.

BBC Animated Map: The Fall of France
This website allows you to view an animated map of the invasion of France with text describing each movement and a timeline of each step. Click "Play" at the bottom of the map to begin, and then click "Next" to view each successive movement.

BBC History: World War Two
This website has an in-depth collection of information on the history of World War II. There is an article on the events of the fall of France under the "Blitzkrieg: Germany's 'Lightning War'" section.

Simon Kitson's Vichy Website
This website is a large collection of links all pertaining to Vichy France. It's not a particularly easy site to navigate, but there is a lot of information stemming out of the main page.

Databases

We have access to several databases of magazine and journal articles that you might find relevant. You will need your username and password to access these from home.

A good place to look for more details may be an article database called JSTOR. If you enter JSTOR and use the checkboxes at the bottom to select their history journals, you can search the full text of thousands of articles. A search using the term “Vichy France,” for example, yields over 3,400 articles!

EBSCO's Academic Search Premier and Infotrac's Academic OneFile are general purpose databases that contain newspaper and magazine articles on the Vichy regime and related topics. These databases focus on current events, but some articles cover historical issues as well.

For very narrow topics, a database called Historical Abstracts may be necessary. HA has a lot of great articles in it, but is not very user-friendly (many articles are also not full-text). Talk to library staff if you need help with HA.